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Saturday, August 15, 2020 | History

5 edition of Insect accessory reproductive structures found in the catalog.

Insect accessory reproductive structures

M. S. Kaulenas

Insect accessory reproductive structures

function, structure, and development

by M. S. Kaulenas

  • 110 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Springer-Verlag in Berlin, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Insects -- Generative organs,
  • Insects -- Reproduction

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 159-206) and index.

    StatementM.S. Kaulenas.
    SeriesZoophysiology ;, v. 31
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL494 .K38 1992
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 224 p. :
    Number of Pages224
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1548477M
    ISBN 103540521119, 0387521119
    LC Control Number91027958

    Reproductive System. The reproductive organs of insects are similar in structure and function to those of vertebrates: a male’s testes produce sperm and a female’s ovaries produce eggs (ova). Both types of gametes are haploid and unicellular, but eggs are usually much larger in volume than sperm. Ultrastructure of male reproductive accessory glands and ejaculatory duct in the Queensland fruit fly (Q-fly), Bactrocera tryoni, were investigated and compared with those of other tephritid accessory glands were found to comprise one pair of mesodermic glands and Cited by:

    The reproductive systems of male and female C. klassi have the generalized structures of insects as specified by Snodgrass () and Heming (). Females possess a pair of ovaries and lateral oviducts, a sperm storage organ (the spermatheca), accessory glands, and a genital chamber (vagina).Cited by: Reproductive System. The reproductive organs of insects are similar in structure and function to those of vertebrates: a male's testes produce sperm and a female's ovaries produce eggs (ova). Both types of gametes are haploid and unicellular, but eggs are usually much larger in volume than sperm.

    Describe the location, structure, and function of the accessory glands of the male reproductive system (seminal vesicles, prostate gland and bulbourethral glands). Accessory Glands •The seminal vesicles lie on the posterior bladder wall and their alkaline secretion accounts for 60% of the volume of semen consisting of fructose, ascorbic acid. Insect digestion: Insects have a “complete digestive system”, meaning there is a mouth and anus rather than a combined organ The abdomen contains the midgut, where most digestion occurs and the organs responsible for waste production and disposal “Stomach” “Kidneys” “Colon” Insect Reproductive Systems Most insects use internalFile Size: 2MB.


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Insect accessory reproductive structures by M. S. Kaulenas Download PDF EPUB FB2

Insect Accessory Reproductive Structures: Function, Structure, and Development (Zoophysiology (31)) Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed.

Edition byCited by: Insect Accessory Reproductive Structures Function, Structure, and Development. Authors: Kaulenas, M.S. Free Preview. Orthoptera Ovar development insects membrane ovary protein protein synthesis reproduction reproductive system sexual differentiation synthesis system testis tissue Authors and affiliations M.

Insect accessory reproductive structures: function, structure, and development. [M S Insect accessory reproductive structures book -- The book provides a comprehensive review on insect accessory reproductive structures.

The topics covered include the development and genetic control of differentiation of the reproductive efferent. Abstract: This book provides a comprehensive review of insect accessory reproductive structures.

Topics covered include the development development Subject Category: Miscellaneous see more details and genetic control of differentiation of the reproductive efferent duct systems and associated structures.

With regard to the female systems, special emphasis is placed on the functions of the Cited by: Insect Accessory Reproductive Structures: Function, Structure, In retrospect, the range of topics covered in this monograph, although forming a coherent ensemble, is so extensive that a detailed discussion could easily extend to three or four times the current length.

Insect Accessory Reproductive Structures: Function, Structure, and Development. [M S Kaulenas] -- The book provides a comprehensive review on insect accessory reproductive structures.

The topics covered include the de- velopment and genetic controlof differentiation of the re- productive efferent. Abstract. The development and relationships of the insect male reproductive system were reviewed in Chapter 2. In this Chapter the structure, function and regulation of the male accessory reproductive structures are by: 1.

Cite this chapter as: Kaulenas M.S. () Structure and Function of the Female Accessory Reproductive Systems. In: Insect Accessory Reproductive by: 6.

Female Reproductive System. The female’s reproductive system contains a pair of ovaries. When the insect is actively reproducing, these organs swell with developing eggs and may nearly fill the abdomen.

Each ovary is subdivided into functional units (called ovarioles) where the eggs are actually produced. A typical ovary may contain dozens. Anatomy of the internal reproductive organs. The male reproductive organs typically consist of a pair of testes connecting with paired seminal vesicles and a median ejaculatory duct (Fig.

In most insects there are also a number of accessory glands which open into the vasa deferentia or the ejaculatory by: the insect head can be found in the mouthpart module. Six or seven segments are condensed to form the head capsule.

This strong structure provides protection for the brain, support for eyes, ocelli, antennae and mouthparts. The strongest muscles in the head serve the mandibles in chewing insects and the sucking pump in piercing-sucking insects.

Reproductive accessory glands of male insects facilitate transfer of sperm to the females. The heterogeneous products of these glands include both the seminal fluids and paraseminal : Cedric Gillott. Insect Reproduction Simon R. Leather, Jim Hardie This text begins with physiology and continues with discussion of new advances in the fields of behavioural and ecological mechanisms of insect.

The paired female accessory glands of Phlebotomus perniciosus (Diptera: Psychodidae) were investigated by light microscopy, and by scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

These glands undergo morphological and functional changes during oocyte development. After the blood meal, the monostratified glandular epithelium differentiates and starts to by: 9. Female insects are able to make eggs, receive and store sperm, manipulate sperm from different males, and lay eggs.

Their reproductive systems are made up of a pair of ovaries, accessory glands, one or more spermathecae, and ducts connecting these ovaries make eggs and accessory glands produce the substances to help package and lay the eggs.

Insect Accessory Reproductive Structures: Function, Structure, and Development Book 31 In retrospect, the range of topics covered in this monograph, although forming a coherent ensemble, is so extensive that a detailed discussion could easily extend to three or four times the current length.

The accessory reproductive glands of Melanoplus sanguinipes comprise two bilateral masses of 16 tubules each, distinguishable in sexually mature insects as four white, ten short hyaline, one long.

The development of the efferent accessory reproductive structures is reasonably well understood at the structural or morphological level across a broad range of insect types.

Kaulenas M.S. () The Reproductive Efferent Duct Systems and Associated Structures. Development and Genetic Control of Differentiation.

In: Insect Accessory Reproductive : M. Kaulenas. The development of the efferent accessory reproductive structures is reasonably well understood at the structural or morphological level across a broad range of insect : Robert Sturm.Male accessory glands (MAG) in humans are the seminal vesicles, prostate gland, and the bulbourethral glands (also called Cowper's glands).

In insects, male accessory glands produce products that mix with the sperm to protect and preserve them, including seminal fluid proteins. Some insecticides can induce an increase in the protein content of the male accessory glands of certain types of insects.The basic component of the male reproductive system is the testis (), suspended in the body cavity by tracheae and fat more primitive apterygote insects have a single testis, and in some lepidopterans the two maturing testes are secondarily fused into one structure during the later stages of larval development, although the ducts leading from them remain separate.